What is the Spatial Web and why should your company care?

First things first. What is the Spatial Web?    

Technically it is a three-dimensional computing environment that can seamlessly combine layers of information gathered from countless geo-located connected devices to create seamless immersive experiences. If that sounds a lot like the Metaverse, you’re right. The two terms are often used interchangeably. However, I prefer to use the name Spatial Web instead of Metaverse, believing the former is both more accurate and descriptive.  

Whichever term you use, the best way to understand it is to experience it. The good news is you can do that right now with your smartphone!  

Head outside for a short walk using Google Maps with Live View enabled. What you will see is an Augmented Reality (AR) view of your walking path. The traditional map view will be on the bottom the screen, and the main screen area is using the camera and placing icons and directional information intelligently on top of the real-world camera view.   

This is the Spatial Web! It’s cool on the smartphone, but imagine if all sunglasses magically projected this as a layer and you did not have to hold the phone at arm’s length as you walk. This is a great way to start imagining what the Spatial Web will be in the near future as new devices seamlessly integrate into our lives. 

Ok, so why should your company care? 

The Spatial Web is coming. There’s no question about that. In fact, many of the component elements such as AR, VR, and the Internet of Things are already in use across multiple sectors. 

The gaming industry and the entertainment sector are the most visible leaders in harnessing the Spatial Web. And Facebook (now Meta) has become, perhaps, the most well-known proponent of it. 

But forward-thinking organizations in many other industries are piloting Spatial Web projects that demonstrate the expanse of potential use cases. 

There are good reasons for pursuing those use cases, too, with pilots already delivering benefits and good returns on investments. 

Let’s take an example where a complex critical system is down, say a Wind Turbine, and a mechanic working on it. The mechanic could use AR-enabled goggles to pull up instructions to guide on-site repairs. Or that mechanic could use the goggles to see design schematics that, using artificial intelligence programs, help pinpoint problems. The mechanic could also use those AR-enabled and internet-connected goggles to collaborate with an engineer from the manufacturer, with the engineer being able to see in real-time exactly what the mechanic sees and does on the machine. 

Such capabilities are already here and improving all the time, giving us a glimpse of what’s on the horizon.  

So, what’s ahead? A future where the Spatial Web will simply be part of how we live, work and engage. 

When that day arrives, these metaverse-type technologies will feel like an extension of yourself, just as smartphones have become ever-present ubiquitous tools that constantly inform, guide and connect us.  

And when that time comes, seeing someone wearing smart glasses will be the norm, not the exception. 

The timeline for that future state is years away. Gartner, a tech research firm, has predicted that widescale adoption of metaverse technologies is a decade away

There are, for sure, technical hurdles that need to be overcome on this Spatial Web journey. 

There have been concerns, for example, about the heat generated from the compute processing in smart glasses, the battery life in connected devices and the vertigo some suffer when using virtual reality. 

But tech companies are working on those issues, and it’s only a matter of time before they have them worked out. After all, they have the incentive to do so as there’s existing market demand for these technologies. 

And we’re already seeing tech companies deliver big advances. They are developing audio technologies to ensure immersive audio experiences. They’re maturing haptic technology, or 3D touch, so you’ll be able to actually feel those actions happening in a virtual world. Some companies are trying to do the same thing with smell. 

These technologies will work with existing ones, such as geolocational tech, sensors, artificial intelligence, 5G and eventually 6G, to instantaneously deliver layers of information to users. 

While a fully-realized Spatial Web is still years away, you shouldn’t wait to start making plans for how you will harness its potential; you can’t wait to think about your strategy until everybody starts buying connected glasses. 

If you do, then you’ll already be behind. And if you wait too long, you’ll miss out. 

The reality today, right now, is that you will have to respond to the Spatial Web as it evolves and as it delivers new ways for organizations and individuals to interact. 

This new technology-driven realm will enable increasingly frictionless services to consumers, seamless B-to-B services and new potential applications that some are already starting to imagine. 

Here at Strive, we are exploring the component technologies that collectively make up the emerging Spatial Web. 

And we’re partnering with clients to envision their Spatial Web strategies, outline the infrastructure and skills they’ll need, and devise the optimal business cases to pursue – all so they’re ready to move as the technologies mature and the Spatial Web moves into the mainstream.

Connect with Strive! 

Here at Strive Consulting, our subject matter experts’ team up with you to understand your core business needs, while taking a deeper dive into your organization’s growth strategy. Whether you’re interested in the Spatial Web or an overall Technology Enablement assessment, Strive Consulting is dedicated to being your partner, committed to success.  

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