Are Your Project Managers Prepared for the Cloud?

Project Managers for the Cloud

The previous year has brought about new changes to many work environments, while accelerating other planned changes such as Cloud deployments. According to the July 2020 Forbes article “Why Enterprises Are Accelerating Cloud Adoption: The swift move to working remotely has meant a spike in the number of companies moving to the Cloud.”, companies like Microsoft and AWS have shown significant increases in their Cloud products in recent months. Consequently, more and more projects will be green-lighted to move systems to the Cloud, which increases the need for Project Managers who understand the unique challenges such projects require. Organizations need to ask themselves…are your Project Managers prepared?

Vendor Management Experience

Cloud projects are inherently different than onsite projects that use local and internal resources. Organizations are now managing systems through remote, third parties, so strong vendor management skills are a must for Project Managers. Instead of resources that are dedicated to the company, Cloud resources serve another master. Project Managers need to ensure the Cloud vendor understands the company’s needs and priorities. Stakeholder desired timelines should be reviewed with the vendor to identify any concerns with any challenges addressed early in the project.

Additionally, the Project Manager needs to identify any processes or restrictions varying vendors may have, such as lead time for equipment delivery or holiday freezes. The Cloud vendor standards will drive most of the processes and need to be clearly understood. For example, if a vendor only does quarterly releases for all clients, then a planned delivery date outside of these standards cannot happen. Flexibility for delivery dates will be more limited in the Cloud, so all parties need to understand expectations.

Deeper Software Understanding

Companies have been installing software onsite for years and have become accustomed to making software adjustments to fit very specific needs. When companies select shared Cloud environments to assist with budget restrictions, this flexibility can be greatly reduced. A Project Manager should ensure restrictions are clearly understood or delivery can be disappointing.

A good example is how sign-on’s are managed. Can single sign-on (SSO) be used? If possible, what exactly does that mean? If a software can maintain data from multiple customers of a company, does a corporate resource have to have multiple logins to access each different customer data set or can they access all via single log-in? If able to access via a single login, does that mean customers could potentially see each other?

Do not assume the answers to the questions. In a previous project, this exact scenario occurred. The Cloud vendor said SSO was possible. Internal resources managed many different clients. When the situation was drilled into, clients were able to see each other via a pop-up menu. The onsite version of the software had the capability to block this view, but the Cloud version did not because a software change would impact all clients of the vendor. The only way to prevent the viewing was for each client to be in another “Cloud instance” that further required a separate login for each client. That meant the internal resource needed a different log-in for each supported client. Does that sound like traditional SSO? No, but from the vendor’s side, it was possible as a pass-off from the company to the vendor, but using the SSO, would have created an insurmountable issue.

Gap Analysis Skills

Many companies choose Cloud offerings to allow for focus on core capabilities. Moving hosting and release management to a vendor can provide significant cost benefits. This often means that companies decide to transition on-site versions of software to the Cloud. The challenge is, even when the software is moving to the Cloud version of itself, there is often a gap. These versions differ for various reasons. One of the most common is they are constructed separately. One version is created for flexibility onsite and based on a single company’s requirements. The other is developed to work with multiple companies in a shared infrastructure. Although the product is the same brand, the software codes are developed separately. These differences are usually discussed at a high-level during sales meetings, but when the project kicks-off, the Project Manager and team need to understand differences at a detailed level. Understanding differences in menus or terminology, as well as infrastructure and outputs.

A good example is how is data handled? When moving programs to the Cloud there is almost always data that must be moved for historic reasons. A Project Manager should not assume it is a one-to-one transfer. It is not unusual for two programs to be developed in totally different teams who may never talk to each other. Knowing that data mapping is critical to the success of any Cloud product, some vendors will provide processes for easy transfer if the data infrastructure is different, but others will place that work on the client. Clarification on these types of organizational pitfalls is crucial before kick-off or before schedule baselining.

The skills above are a good start to identifying stronger Project Management skills needed for Cloud environment projects. Overall, when running Cloud projects, Project Managers need to increase diligence in several areas to ensure quality performance as more and more projects will involve Cloud implementations. Strive prides themselves on not only excellent project management experience, but first-hand knowledge when it comes to Cloud adoption and enablement. With our successful and extensive channel partner relationships, with companies like Microsoft and Snowflake, and our robust in-house Management Consulting and Technology Enablement practice areas, our subject matter experts make navigating the Cloud easier and more efficient.

 

Author

Kathy Loveless

Kathy Loveless, PMP, SPC, CSP™, PMI-ACP, CSM™, SA

Manager, Management Consulting, Dallas

 

 

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